• Users Online: 631
  • Print this page
  • Email this page
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 229-235

The effects of virtual-augmented reality training on anxiety among operating room students attending coronary artery bypass graft surgery


1 Department of Operating Room, Student Research Committee, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran
2 Department of Medical Education, Medical Education Development Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran
3 Isfahan Cardiovascular Research Center, Cardiovascular Research Institute, Isfahan, University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran
4 Department of Operating Room, Nursing and Midwifery Care Research Center, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran

Correspondence Address:
Ahmad Ghadami
Department of Operating Room, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, 2nd Floor, Hezarjerib Street, Isfahan.
Iran
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/nms.nms_95_20

Rights and Permissions

Background: Operating room (OR) students experience varying levels of anxiety during their internship program in the OR. Educational technology has the potential for reducing anxiety. Objectives: This study aimed at assessing the effects of training based on virtual-augmented reality (VAR) on anxiety among OR students attending coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. Methods: This randomized controlled trial was conducted in 2020. Thirty-six OR students were conveniently recruited and randomly allocated to an intervention (n = 18) and a control (n = 18) group. Participants in the control group received conventional training, whereas their counterparts in the intervention group received VAR training through watching a 360-degree VAR video of CABG surgery in addition to conventional training. The State-Trait Anxiety Inventory was used for anxiety assessment in both groups at three time points, namely before entering the OR on the first day of the internship program, after entering the OR but before scrub, and on the last day of the program. The data were analyzed through the independent-samples t test, the Chi-square test, and the repeated-measures analysis of variance. Results: There was no significant difference between the intervention and the control groups regarding the pretest mean scores of state anxiety (40.61 ± 7.63 vs. 41.59 ± 5.09; P = 0.66) and trait anxiety (39.17 ± 7.39 vs. 39.29 ± 6.05; P = 0.96). However, the mean scores of state and trait anxiety in the intervention group were significantly less than the control group at both the first posttest (33.17 ± 6.16 vs. 45.06 ± 8.69 and 33.56 ± 6.19 vs. 42.59 ± 6.62; P < 0.001) and the second posttest (32.39 ± 4.62 vs. 42.35 ± 6.14 and 32.94 ± 5.20 vs. 41.0 ± 5.58; P < 0.001). Conclusion: VAR training is effective in significantly reducing anxiety among OR students attending CABG surgery.




[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed1777    
    Printed86    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded186    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal